20. 06. 11
Created: 11 June 2020

Curriculum Vitae

Digital Design Researcher and Educator

last update: 11 February 2020

 

 

  

 

Education

05/2010 - 11/2014  
Doctoral programme in Computer Science (Human-Computer Interaction). Graduation 18 November 2014
Vienna University of Technology
 
10/2008 - 02/2011  
Master's programme Medical Informatics. Graduation with distinction (1st February 2011)
Thesis title: Linking Physical and Digital Objects - An Exploration of different Labeling Techniques. 
Vienna University of Technology
 
03/2008 - 11/2009  
Master's programme Computer Science Management. Graduation with distinction (3rd November 2009)
Thesis title: Electromyographic Human Startle Experiments: Toolbox Implementation and Software Education.
Vienna University of Technology
 
10/2006 - 12/2015  
Diploma programme Psychology
Completion of the first study section in December 2015 (passed first study exam - "1.Diplomprüfung")
 
10/2004 - 02/2008  
Bachelor's programme Medical Informatics
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Medicine (5th March 2008).
Vienna University of Technology, Medical University of Vienna and University of Vienna (joint programme)
 

 

 

 

Professional Work Experience

since 01/2019
 
Professor for Interaction Design
New Design University St. Pölten
10/2014 - 02/2019
 
Post Research Assistant (Universitätsassistent)
Institute for Design and Assessment of Technology
Vienna University of Technology   
05/2010 - 09/2014
 
Predoc Research Assistant (Universitätsassistent)
Institute for Design and Assessment of Technology
Vienna University of Technology
04/2008 - 04/2010  
Software Engineering
Brain Research Lab
Faculty of Psychology, University of Vienna

 

Project Experiences

I was involved in writing up a number of project proposals for funding, both on a national and on the European level. I contributed research to various projects:

  • 2019 "Audicom" Netidee Project (Responsibility: project lead, user research, dissemination)
  • 2018 Jan-Mar "WayKey" FFG Project (Responsibility: prototyping)
  • 2018 Apr-Sept "iToilet" EU Project under the AAL Joint Programme (Responsibility: user research, dissemniation)
  • 2017 "Schaukasten" Project (Responsibility: user research, conceptual design, prototyping, dissemination)
  • 2016 Oct-Dec "Outside the Box" FWF Project (Responsibility: prototyping, user research)
  • 2015-2017 "Give and Take" EU Project under the AAL Joint Programme (Responsibility: user research)
  • 2011-2013 "Stimulate" EU Project under the AAL Joint Programme (Responsibility: prototyping, explorative design)
  • 2011-2013 "Handcam" (a.k.a. Flexglove) project, funded by UNIQA (Responsibility: project lead, prototyping, dissemination)

 

Teaching Experience

Currently, I have taught more than 30 courses on Interaction Design and related topics.

I was also involved in the supervision and co-supervision of a number of Bachelor, Master, and Phd students.

--> Overview

 

Peer-reviewed Publications

Journal Papers

  • Güldenpfennig, F., Ganhör, R., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2015). Will it catch their attention? Evaluating situated and peripheral displays in a personal context". In Interaction Design and Architecture(s) Journal. PDF.
  • Sailer, U.,  Güldenpfennig, F., & Eggert, T. (2015). Saccade-related potentials during eye-hand coordination: Effects of hand movements on saccade preparation. Accepted for Motor Control
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Nunes, F., Ganglbauer, E., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2015). Making Space to Engage: An Open-Ended Exploration of Technology Design with Older Adults. Accepted for International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction (IJMHCI). PDF.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Reitberger, W., Ganglbauer, E., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2014). Duography in The Classroom: Creative Engagement with Two-sided Mobile Phone Photography. International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction (IJMHCI) 6, 3 (2014), 51-67. PDF. Blog.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2014). Personal Digital Archives on Mobile Phones with MEO. Pers Ubiquit Comput 19, 2 (2015), 445-461. PDF. Blog.
  • Reitberger, W., Güldenpfennig, F., Ganglbauer, E., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2014). Interaction Beyond the Desktop für Reflektion und Persuasion. Informatik Spektrum 37, 5 (2014), 435-439. Springer.

 

Conference Papers

  • Güldenpfennig, F., Fikar P., & Ganhör, R. (2020). Teaching Digital Fabrication to Early Intervention Specialists for Designing Their Own Tools. Accepted for ASSETS'20,
  • Urbanek, M., & Güldenpfennig, F. (2019). Celebrating 20 Years of Computer-based Audio Gaming. In Proc Audio Mostly 2019, ACM. PDF.
  • Urbanek, M., Habiger, M., & Güldenpfennig, F. (2019). Creating Audio Games Online with a Browser-Based Editor. In Proc Audio Mostly 2019, ACM. PDF.
  • Urbanek, M., & Güldenpfennig, F. (2019). Unpacking the Audio Game Experience: Lessons Learned from Game Veterans. In Proc Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play (CHI PLAY'19), ACM. PDF.
  • Urbanek, M., Habiger, M., & Güldenpfennig, F. (2019). Drag 'n' Hear: Creating, Playing, and Understanding Audio Games Online. In Proc Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play (CHI PLAY'19), ACM. PDF.
  • Mayer,P., Güldenpfennig, F., & Panek, P. (2019). Towards Smart Adaptive Care Toilets. In Studies in health technology and informatics, 260, pp. 9-16.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Mayer, P., Panek, P., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2019). An Autonomy-Perspective on the Design of Assistive Technology: Experiences of People with Multiple Sclerosis. To appear at Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'19). PDF.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Dudo, D., & Purgathofer, P. (2019). The 'Magic Paradigm' for Programming Smart Connected Devices. To appear at Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'19). PDFPOSTER.
  • Güldenpfennig, F. (2018). Tailor-made Accessible Computers: An Interactive Toolkit for Iterative Co-Design. In Proc International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interactions. PDF.
  • Fikar P., Güldenpfennig F., & Ganhör, R. (2018). The Cuebe: Facilitating Playful Early Intervention for the Visually Impaired. In Proc International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interactions. PDF.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Fikar P., & Ganhör, R. (2018). Interactive and Open-Ended Sensory Toys: Designing with Therapists and Children for Tangible and Visual Interaction. In Proc International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interactions. PDF.
  • Fikar, P., Güldenpfennig, F., & Ganhör, R. (2018). The Use(fullness) of Therapeutic Toys: Practice-derived Desing Lenses for Toy Design. In Proc Designing Interactive Systems (DIS'18). Draft PDF.
  • Fikar, P., Güldenpfennig, F., & Ganhör, R. (2018). Pick, Place, and Follow: A Ball Run for Visually Impaired Children. In Proc Designing Interactive Systems (DIS'18). PDF.
  • Urbanek, M., Güldenpfennig, F., & Schrempf, M. (2018). Building a Communnity of Audio Game Designers - Towards an Online Audio Game Editor. In Proc Designing Interactive Systems (DIS'18). PDF.
  • Salihodzic, H., Zilberburg, K., Chakhmaghi, N., Güldenpfennig, F., Fikar, P., & Ganhör, R. (2018). LightSight. A Dice to Meet the Eyes. In Proc Designing Interactive Systems (DIS'18). PDF.
  • Urbanek M., Fikar P., & Güldenpfennig, F. (2018). About the Sound of Bananas - Anti Rules for Audio Game Design. In Proc. International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, IEEE. PDF.
  • Ganhör, R., & Güldenpfennig, F. (2017). Webisodes: Examining the Making of an Emergent Internet Medium. Paper presented at the British HCI. PDF.
  • Güldenpfennig, F. (2017). Making a Customized DIY-Computer with Infobricks. Paper presented at the British HCI. PDF.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Fikar, P., & Ganhör, R. (2017). Towards Interactive and Motivating Stimuli for Children with Visual Impairments. Paper presented at the British HCI. PDF.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Nunes, F., Subasi, Ö., & Urbanek, M. (2017). UbiKit: Learning to Prototype for Tangible and Ubiquitous Computing. Paper presented at the British HCI. PDF.
  • Urbanek, M., & Güldenpfennig, F. (2017). Rethinking Prototyping for Audio Games: On Different Modalities in the Prototyping Process. Paper presented at the British HCI. PDF.
  • Urbanek, M., & Güldenpfennig, F. (2017). Tangible Audio Game Development Kit: Prototyping Audio Games with a Tangible Editor. Paper presented at the International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interactions, Japan. PDF.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Ganhör, R., & Fitzpatrick G. (2017). How to Look at Two-sided Photos? – Exploring Novel Perspectives on Digital Images. In Proc MobileHCI'17.PDF.
  • Reichl, P., Löw,  C., Schröder, S., Schmidt, T., Schatzl, B., Lushaj V., Hödl, O., Güldenpfennig, F., & Widauer, C. (2016). The Salome Experience: Opera Live Streaming and Beyond. Case Study accepted for CHI 2016. *Honorable Mention Award*
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Dudo, D., & Purgathofer, P. (2016) Toward Thingy Oriented Programming: Recording Macros with Tangibles. In Proc TEI'16, pp. 455-461. PDF.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Hödl, O., Reichl, P., Löw, C., Gartus, A., & Pelowski, M. (2016). TASK: Introducing the Interactive Audience Sensor Kit. In Proc TEI'16, pp. 448-454. PDF.
  • Zhang, J.,  Brereton, M.,  Purgathofer, P.,  Fitzpatrick, G., & Güldenpfennig, F. (2016). Handle the Way: Enhancing Web Accessibility for People with Disability. Work-in-progress Paper accepted for DIS'16.
  • Ganglbauer, E., Fitzpatrick, G., Güldenpfennig, F. (2015). Why and what did we throw out? Probing on Reflection through the Food Waste Diary. Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Seoul, Republic of Korea (pp. 1105-1114). ACM.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Nunes, F., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2015). Integrating informal care into formal settings. Paper presented at the International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technolgies for Healthcare 2015. PDF.
  • Ganhör, R., & Güldenpfennig, F. (2015). INSERT: Efficient Sorting of Images on Mobile Devices. Long Paper presented at OzCHI 2015. ACM.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., & Ganhör, R. (2015). Sitting in the same Boat: A Case Study of a Combined Awareness System and Behaviour Change Technology. Short Paper presented at OzCHI 2015. ACM.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2015). De+re: A Design Concept for Provoking Meaningful interactive Experiences. Long Paper presented at the proceedings of the International Conference of Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia (MUM 2015). ACM. PDF.
  • Ganglbauer, E., Fitzpatrick, G., Subasi, Ö., Güldenpfennig, F. (2014). Think globally, act locally: A Case Study of a free Food Sharing Community and Social Networking. Full Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 17th ACM conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA (pp.911-921). ACM.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Fitzpatrick, G., & Reitberger, W. (2014). Making Sense of Rich Data Collections on Mobile Devices. Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 2014 European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics, Vienna, Austria. ACM.
  • Ganhör R., Güldenpfennig, F., Subasi, Ö., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2014). Towards Fast and Interactive Prototypes of Mobile Apps. Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 26th Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference on Designing Futures: the Future of Design, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. PDF.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2013a). A monitoring Device as assistive Lifestyle Technology: Combining functional Needs with Pleasure. Short Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 4th Augmented Human International Conference, Stuttgart, Germany (pp.190-193). ACM. PDF. Blog.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2013b). Towards Rapid Technology Probes for Senior People Human Factors in Computing and Informatics (pp. 664-671): Springer Berlin Heidelberg. Springer Link. PDF. Blog.
  • Reitberger, W., Güldenpfennig, F., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2012). Persuasive Technology considered harmful? An Exploration of Design Concerns through the TV companion. Full Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Persuasive Technology: Design for Health and Safety, Linköping, Sweden (pp.239-250). ACM. PDF. Blog.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Reitberger, W., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2012a). Capturing rich Media through Media Objects on Smartphones. Short Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 24th Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference, Melbourne, Australia (pp.180-183). ACM. PDF. Blog.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Reitberger, W., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2012b). Of unkempt hair, dirty Shirts and smiling Faces: Capturing behind the Mobile Camera. Full Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 7th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Making Sense Through Design, Copenhagen, Denmark (pp.298-307). ACM. PDF. Blog.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Reitberger, W., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2012c). Through two different Lenses: a Tool for new Perspectives into Context. Full Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 24th Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference, Melbourne, Australia (pp.170-179). ACM. Blog. *Best Paper Award*
  • Güldenpfennig, F., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2011). Getting more out of your Images: Augmenting Photos for Recollection and Reminiscence. Short Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 25th BCS Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom (pp.467-472). ACM. PDF. Blog. 

 

Workshop Paper(s) and Posters

  • Ganhör, R., Güldenpfennig, F., & Fikar, P. 2020. Interactive Play and Modern Media Tools. Workshop contribution presented at ACM International Conference on Interactive Media Experiences.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Fikar, P., & Ganhör, R. (2019). A Tangible Color-Picker Toy Designed for Young Children: Balancing Physical Properties and Play Elements Through Design. Workshop contribution presented at CHI'19, Glasgow, Scotland.
  • Fikar, P., Güldenpfennig, F., & Ganhör, R. (2019). Reflections on Mobility in the Design of Therapeutic Toys. Workshop contribution for Communities & Technologies (C&T'19), Vienna, Austria.
  • Urbanek, M., Güldenpfennig, F., & Habiger, M. (2019). A Toolkit for creating Audio Games: Balancing Ease of Use and Power of Features. Workshop contribution for Communities & Technologies (C&T'19), Vienna, Austria.
  • Güldenpfennig, F. (2019). Creating Accessible Computers with Infobricks. Workshop Contribution for Communities & Technologies (C&T'19), Vienna, Austria.
  • Baldauf, M., Reitberger W., Güldenpfennig, F., & Grechenig, T. (2016). Jut one more thing! Investigating mobile follow-up questions for opinion polls on public displays. Poster presented at PerDis'16.
  • Ganhör, R., & Güldenpfennig, F. FamOz: Fast Mobile Wizard of Ozzing For Sketch-based UI Prototypes. Workshop paper presented at the Proccedings of MobileHCI 2013, Munich, Germany.

 

PhD Thesis

  • Güldenpfennig, F. The CuDe Framework: Designing Digital Souvenirs for Meaningful Remembering Experiences. Vienna University of Technology 2014. PDF. 

 

Other Publications (No Peer-review)

  • Roman Ganhör, Peter Fikar, and Florian Güldenpfennig. (2018). SensoryToys - Multimodal Play. Poster presented at i2c 2018.
  • Peter Fikar, Roman Ganhör, and Florian Güldenpfennig. (2017). Multimodales Spielzeug für Kinder mit starker Sehbehinderung. Work presented at IKT-Forum'17.
  • Fitzpatrick, G., Tellioglu, H., Zagler, W., Pohl, M., Güldenpfennig, F., Hödl, O., Ganhör, R., Mayer, P., & Frauenberger,C. (2015). Organisational Overview: Institute for Design and Assessment of Technology, Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien). INTERACT (4) 2015: 624-625. Springer.
  • Peter Reichl, Christian Löw, Oliver Hödl, Svenja Schröder, Florian Güldenpfennig, Christopher Widauer. (2015). Das Projekt "The Salome Experience": Perspektiven für das Live-Streaming von Oper und Konzert. In Proc EVA2015.

 

Invited Book Chapters

  • Florian Güldenpfennig, Armin Wagner, Peter Fikar, Georg Kaindl, and Roman Ganhör. (2019). Enabling Learning Experiences for Visually Impaired Children by Interaction Design. In Haptic Interfaces for Accessibility, Health, and Enhanced Quality of Life. Troy McDaniel, Sethuraman Panchanathan (Editors). Springer.

 

Interactive Demos

 

  • Urbanek, M., Habiger, M., & Güldenpfennig, F. (2019). Interactive demo of AudiCom. during CHIPlay'19 in Barcelona, Spain.
  • Urbanek, M., Habiger, M., & Güldenpfennig, F. (2019). Interactive demo of AudiCom. during Audio Mostly'19 in Nottingham, UK.
  • Güldenpfennig, F. (2018). Interactive demo of Infobricks during Int. Conference for Tangible and Embodied Interaction (TEI’18) in Stockholm, Sweden.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Fikar, P., & Ganhör, R. (2018). Interactive demo of BoostBeans during Int. Conference for Tangible and Embodied Interaction (TEI’18) in Stockholm, Sweden.Fikar, P.,
  • Güldenpfennig, F., & Ganhört, R. (2018). Interactive demo of Cuebe during Int. Conference for Tangible and Embodied Interaction (TEI’18) in Stockholm, Sweden.
  • Salihodzic, H., Zilberburg,K. , Chakhmaghi, N., Güldenpfennig, F., Fikar, P., & Ganhör, R. (2018).Interactive demo of LightSight during Int. Conference for Designing Interactive Systems (DIS'18).
  • Hödl, O., Kocher, G., Bernscherer, C., & Güldenpfennig, F. (2017). Live-Projection of dancers' heartbeat in Attila Bako’s Shadows We Cast in Theater Akzent, Wien, Austria.
  • Güldenpfennig, F. (2017). Interactive demo of UbiKit during British HCI in Sunderland, UK.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Fikar, P., & Ganhör, R. (2017). Interactive demo of Schaukasten Project during British HCI in Sunderland, UK.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Hödl, O., Reichl, P., Löw, C., Gartus, A., & Pelowski, M. (2016). Interactive demo of Task during Int. Conference for Tangible and Embodied Interaction (TEI’16) in Eindhoven, Netherlands.
  • Güldenpfennig, F., Dudo, D., & Purgathofer, P. (2016). Interactive demo of Thingy-Oriented Programming during Int. Conference for Tangible and Embodied Interaction (TEI’16) in Eindhoven, Netherlands.
  • Hödl, O., & Güldenpfennig, F. (2015). Interactive installation The Salome Experience during net:25 Conference.

 

19. 02. 10
Created: 10 February 2019

Courses at Vienna University of Technology

Summer 2018  
HCI in Healthcare
Winter 2018/19  
 
Interaction Beyond the Desktop (20 students)
Building Interaction Interfaces (09 students)
(Responsibiity: 100% course design, lectures)
Summer 2018  
 
HCI in Healthcare (12 students)
(Stand-in for Prof. Fitzpatrick)
Winter 2017/18  
 
Interaction Beyond the Desktop (22 students)
Building Interaction Interfaces (12 students)
(Responsibiity: 100% course design, lectures)
Summer 2017  
 
Basics oh Human-Computer Interaction (675 students)
(Responsibiity: 60% of lectures)
From Design to Software 1 (2 students)
Winter 2016/17  
 
Interaction Beyond the Desktop (17 students)
Building Interaction Interfaces (16 students)
(Responsibiity: 100% course design, all lectures)
Summer 2016  
 
Basics of Human-Computer Interaction (678 students)
(Responsibiity: 60% of lectures)
HCI in Healthcare (Assisting Geraldine Fitzpatrick) 
Winter 2015/16  
 
Interaction Beyond the Desktop (38 students)
Building Interaction Interfaces (24 students)
(Responsibiity: 100% course design, all lectures)
Summer 2015  
 
Basics of Human-Computer Interaction (702 students)
(Responsibiity: 60% of lectures)
Winter 2014/15  
 
Interaction Beyond the Desktop (23 students)
Building Interaction Interfaces (18 students)
(Responsibiity: 100% course design, all lectures)
Summer 2014  
 
HCI in Healthcare (7 students)
(Assisting Geraldine Fitzpatrick)
Winter 2013/14            
 
Interaction Beyond the Desktop (25 students)
Building Interaction Interfaces (16 students)
(Responsibiity: course design, 60% of lectures)
Summer 2013  
 
HCI in Healthcare (24 students)
(Assisting Geraldine Fitzpatrick)
Winter 2012/13  
 
Interaction Beyond the Desktop (45 students)
Building Interaction Interfaces (29 students)
(Responsibiity: course design, 60% of lectures)
Winter 2011/12  
 
Interaction Beyond the Desktop (47 students)
Buidling Interaction Interfaces (36 students)
(Responsibiity: course design, 60% of lectures)
Summer 2011  
 
Interaction Beyond the Desktop (16 students)
(Assisting Geraldine Fitzpatrick)
Winter 2010/11  
 
Interface and Interaction Design
(Assisting Peter Purgathofer)

 

Courses at other locations

Summer 2019  
 
Mikrokontroller Anwendungen (with Franz Werner)
FH Campus Wien
Summer 2018  
 
Mikrokontroller Anwendungen (with Franz Werner)
FH Campus Wien
Summer 2017  
 
Mikrokontroller Anwendungen (with Franz Werner)
FH Campus Wien
Summer  2016  

 

Course module "Research and Information Resources"
SAE Institute, Vienna

Winter 2016            
 
Tablet and mobile phone training for senior citizens
Seniorenzentrum Schwechat   

 

 

(Co-)supervision of Bachelor/Master/PhD Theses

  • Harald Stix. 2012. Development of a wearable computing glove to detect spasms and log information to support therapy. Joint master thesis 2012 (TU Wien).
  • Markus Martin. 2012. Development of a wearable computing glove to detect spasms and log information to support therapy. Joint master thesis 2012 (TU Wien).
  • Christof Kopfer. 2012. SenseRhetoric: Using Sensor Technologies for Improving Communication Skills. Master thesis 2012 (TU Wien).
  • Thomas Adelbauer. 2012. Massive Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game. Bachelor Thesis 2012 (TU Wien).
  • Jakob Frohnwieser. 2013. Prototyping Citizen Sensing Networks. Bachelor thesis 2013 (TU Wien).
  • Gabriel Größbacher. 2014. Flexglove. Bachelor thesis 2014 (TU Wien).
  • Daniel Dudo. 2015. Technisches Proof-of-concept für ein modulares System zur 'thing-orientierten' Programmierung von Ubicomp Applikationen. Bachelor thesis 2015 (TU Wien).
  • Djordje Slijepčević. 2015. Learning Programmes and People with Disabilities: Case study of the impact of a computer-based learning programme on the cognitive skills and social interaction of a specific user with cerebral palsy. Bachelor thesis 2014 (TU Wien). 
  • Dominik Hartl. 2025. Just one more page: Persuasive Technologies as an intervention strategy against bedtime procrastination. Master thesis 2015 (TU Wien).
  • Gerfried Mikusch. 2015. Supporting Social Awareness across distributed Work Groups with interactive tangible Devices. Master thesis 2016 (TU Wien).
  • Daniel Dudo. 2018. Designing a Tangible Programming Interface for the Internet of Things. Master thesis 2018 (TU Wien).
  • Lisa Lengauer. 2018. Participatory Research for a Pressure-sensitive Pen For Children with Problems in Controlling Their Strength During Writing. Master thesis 2018 (FH Campus Wien).
  • Johanna Pfabigan. 2018. Development of a Pressure-sensitive Pen For Children with Problems in Controlling Their Strength During Writing. Master thesis 2018 (FH Campus Wien).
  • Patrizia Murko. 2019. Explorative Design of a gesture-based video game environment for people with dementia considering reminiscence triggers. Master thesis 2019 (FH Campus Wien).
  • Lukas Wohofsky. 2019. Design and development of a programmable, individual remote control for infrared controlled devices for people with upper limb motor disabilities. Master thesis 2019 (FH Campus Wien).
  • Michael Urbanek. 2020. Understanding Audio Games: Perspectives and Guides for Design. PhD thesis 2020 (TU Wien).
  • Jaison Puthenkalam. 2020. Pen-Post: Using Smartpens to Support Active Communication for Elders. Master thesis 2020 (TU Wien).
  • Georg Edlinger. Virtual Ball-run for Children with CVI. Master thesis, ongoing (TU Wien). 
  • Markus Hassler. Requirements for a prototype that supports rehabilitation of patients with neglect following stroke. Master thesis, ongoing (TU Wien).

 

 

18. 06. 01
Created: 01 June 2018

Bill of materials

  • 1x TCS3200D color sensor
  • 5x Neopixel ws2812b
  • 1x resistor 330 Ohms
  • 1x capacitor 1000 uF 6.3V
  • 2x Eneloop AAA
  • 1x battery holder for 2 AAA
  • 1x small on/off switch
  • 1x boost converter 5V
  • 2x push button. These fit into our STL model.
  • 1x charger for Eneloop batteries
  • 1x power jack for charger. We used a 5.5mm/2.1mm DC barrel plug
  • 1 x 6-pin stacking header
  • 4 x small skrews

Resources

Notes on pin connections

  • The switch should be connected to VCC battery, VCC In Boost, and VCC of the power jack. Put VCC in die middle so that the decive is shut off while charging. 
  • Connect VCC Out Boost and GND Boost to the Arduino's RAW and GND
  • Neopixels' Data line is connected to 300 Ohms and then to Arduino D11
  • Neopixels' VCC and GND is connected to the capacitor
  • The push buttons are connected to GND and D3
  • Colorsensor S3 goes to D7
  • Colorsensor S2 goes to D6
  • Colorsensor S0 goes to 5V
  • Colorsensor S1 goes to GND
  • Colorsensor VCC goes to D10
  • Colorsensor Out goes tp D8
Read More: Cuebe V2b Build Instructions
14. 05. 16
Created: 16 May 2014

Research Statement

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) has expanded rapidly since its establishment as a field, not even half a century ago. Today, it is concerned with almost every conceivable topic that deals with humans (or animals even) and technology. My research contributes to this eclectic endeavor by the creation and study of novel interactive devices, services, and interaction techniques, designed to support specific needs. These needs are often articulated by marginalized user groups like people with disabilities (in particular, in my more recent work for my habilitation), the interactive artifacts are often smart tangibles incorporating embedded systems, and the design process is regularly employed as an epistemological device for inquiry (“design-led” or “practice-based research” or “research through design”). That is, the whole human-centered design circle, from ideation to prototyping to evaluation, is used to unravel insights into design and related social phenomena by drawing on design’s capability to “pose questions” and to alter situations by the introduction of designed artifacts. In this course, rapid prototyping iterations allow the users or participants to receive first-hand experiences of novel artifacts or services and to further appropriate them according to their needs. These appropriations and the way people make use of the artifacts, again, constitute intended learning opportunities to contribute to design knowledge.


At the end of the first decade of the new century, mobile phone usage picked up momentum, and this now ubiquitous technology came along with an enormous impact on people’s life and society. For example, people started the everyday habit of creating an astonishing amount of digital photographs, only to leave them unattended on the storage space of their mobile devices and to never revisit them again. In my dissertation, I took a design-led and interdisciplinary route to explore ways people can capture valuable digital resources for remembering, which go beyond conventional (digital) photography. Facilitated by recent advancements in technology, I created a number of interactive artifacts for capturing media content like photos, videos, GPS coordinates, etc. with mobile phones. For example, my application “2sidez” triggered both front- and back-facing camera of mobile phones at the same time, resulting in digital photos with literally speaking two sides (back-side showing the photographer and front-side the motif). It was downloaded more than 250.000 times on Android devices, and this “experiment” led to a fruitful resource for people for dwelling in and reminiscing about the past as well as for conducting PhD research about people’s experiences with novel media formats to support remembering. Drawing on primarily qualitative research methods like “Thematic Analysis”, I synthesized the findings of the “2sidez” deployment and insights form my additional design interventions into a framework, supporting designers of digital memory systems in analyzing, understanding and exploiting digital memory retrieval cues (e.g., photo, video, audio, etc.).


In sum, the dissertation led to eight first-authored publications at established international conferences and journals. All of them explored how media content could be captured, related to each other, and experienced in innovative ways: (1) “Getting more out of your images: Augmenting photos for recollection and reminiscence” presented first work-in-progress at the British HCI Conference 2011. (2) “Capturing rich media through Media Objects on smartphones” and (3) “Through two different lenses: A tool for new perspectives into context” were both presented at the Australian HCI Conference 2012. The latter paper won the best paper award and was based on the “2sidez” app. (4) “Of unkempt hair, dirty shirts and smiling faces: Capturing behind the mobile camera”, presented at the Nordic HCI Conference 2012, and (5) “Duography in the classroom: Creative engagement with two-sided mobile phone photography” published in the International Journal of Mobile HCI 2015, were further publications about “2sidez” in different application areas. The remaining three of eight articles all explored how different media content could function as memory retrieval cues when combined with further contextual information: (6) “Making sense of rich data collections on mobiles” was presented at the European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2014, (7) “Digital archives on mobile phones with MEO” was published in the iournal of Personal and Ubiquitous Computing 2015 and (8) “De+re: A design concept for provoking meaningful interactive experiences” was presented at the International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia 2015.

My more recent research and my work for the habilitation connect to the dissertation work through the use of digital photography. There are a great number of marginalized user groups that can benefit strongly by means of digital photography and from communication technology, for example, to overcome social isolation or to spur their experience of self-efficacy and overall autonomy. Thus, taking a practice-based approach again, I created several design artifacts aimed at people with motor disabilities or at older people who are not used to information technology. Among other artifacts, I designed easy to operate digital cameras for capturing photos and sharing them online including associated digital photo-frame devices for receiving and displaying these images. This work led to several first authored publications (e.g.,” Making space to engage: An open-ended exploration of technology design with older adults” in International Journal of Mobile HCI 2015) and to the winning of the UINQA/ÖAR Design Competition for “A monitoring Device as assistive Lifestyle Technology: Combining functional Needs with Pleasure” (presented at Augmented Human International Conference 2013). I continued this strand of research by focusing on the theme of autonomy and by exploring how marginalized people can be supported by technology in living autonomously. Currently, a first-authored manuscript named “An autonomy-perspective on the design of assistive technology: Experiences of people with Multiple Sclerosis” is to appear at CHI'19. This EU-funded work investigated what the notion of autonomy meant to physically disabled people and what they thought technology could do for them. Moreover, I had the opportunity to advance my design and research by working with children with Autism as well as visually impaired children in a number of nationally funded projects. Especially, the latter project resulted in a series of publications at excellent conferences, which I authored or co-authored. In this work, we investigated the design space of occupational therapy (e.g., “The use(fullness) of therapeutic toys: Practice-derived design lenses for toy design” at Designing Interactive Systems 2018) and how novel interactive toys could be employed to build up competencies in affected children in order to strengthen their autonomy (e.g., “Interactive and open-ended sensory toys: Designing with therapists and children for tangible and visual interaction” presented at Tangible and Embodied Interaction 2018). Methodologically, I continued the use of qualitative research methods (e.g., by studying and employing “Grounded Theory” methods) and associated interpretative approaches to epistemology. While most of the dissertation design work was based on mobile phone and tablet applications, my newer artifacts are increasingly based on digital fabrication technologies like 3D-printing and laser-cutting. Those techniques enabled the above-mentioned design of interactive therapeutic toys or additional smart devices like toolkits for customizing accessible Internet computers (e.g., see my publication “Tailor-made accessible computers: An interactive toolkit for iterative co-design” presented at Tangible and Embodied Interaction 2018).

In conclusion, my research is characterized by practice-based interventions to support people with innovative, often smart and networked technologies. From a practical perspective, I make use of tools for digital fabrication like 3D-printers or laser-cutters for creating physical designs, and I complement this with higher-level programming frameworks like Arduino or the Android API to implement interactivity. Theoretically, I mostly draw on qualitative research methods to understand people’s experiences of their social world and of the technologies that surround them. This understanding in combination with own experiences made during iterative prototyping processes is the resource for my contributions to advancing design knowledge. Currently, I prepare the newer body of my work, in particular the research about technology, autonomy, and the need’s of marginalized user groups, for submission as my habilitation thesis.

 

14. 05. 16
Created: 16 May 2014

Teaching Statement

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) concerns the design and assessment of interactive products with the user in mind. Hence, researchers, engineers, and designers working in HCI need an understanding of both technology and people. In more detail, professionals should develop technical skills as well as design competencies to create and analyze interactive artifacts situated in use. Moreover, they have to build up a repertoire of research methods to study how people appropriate these designs and to elaborate their insights scientifically. Apparently, the acquisition of such broad skills needs an ambitious training. To face this challenge, I chose to implement numerous hands-on and tangible design exercises in my courses in HCI and complement them with corresponding theory (see below for a course overview). In my experience, HCI is a highly suitable subject of study for combining practical exercises with theoretical considerations in order to create a deep, lasting, and also fun learning experience. Overall, my primary teaching objectives are three-fold:

  • Students learn to conceive well-founded design concepts and to systematically implement them in soft- and hardware.
  • Students learn to take the users’ perspective, and they realize the importance and multifaceted nature of social factors in interaction design.
  • Students learn to justify and choose appropriate means for their work (e.g., selecting an appropriate prototyping technique or evaluation method) and can relate it to the scientific literature.

To accomplish these learning objectives, I motivate the students by incorporating cutting-edge and illustrative (and often fascinating) research, for example, on tangible or ubiquitous computing, and I draw on aforementioned practical hands-on activities. These can be “conventional” brainstorming sessions but also additional user-centered design methods or ideation techniques like paper prototyping or design/future workshops. For ensuring to engage students in relevant topics facilitated by hands-on experiences, I also created a number of optimized toolkits for my teaching. UbiKit [1], for example, enables students to quickly create tangible user interfaces by assigning capacitive touch-buttons to interactive functions. By means of UbiKit, the students were able to obtain quick feedback on their design proposals and interactive prototypes. This was both important for motivational reasons as well as to learn appropriate approaches to designing interactive products. Moreover, I developed a mobile phone application for gathering user requirements in an innovative fashion. Here, the motivation was to provide the students with a new perspective on the context of use and thus provoke interesting insights. This idea led to a publication at the OzCHI conference and finally won the best paper award [2]. I also regularly encourage students to conduct additional scientific research about their prototypes. So, one group of students developed a prototype ("LightSight") for children with vision impairment in one of my courses lately. This effort resulted in a publication [3] at the Designing Interactive Systems conference, and this also highlights the special eligibility of the domain of HCI for combining teaching with state-of-the-art research.

ubiubi

 

 

Demo Videos from Building Interaction Interfaces and Beyond the Desktop

 

Following videos were created during the courses “Building Interaction Interfaces” and “Beyond the Desktop” of the master programme Media Informatics. The ideas and videos are property of the students. They work in groups, and each group is supposed to create about five prototypes of interactive systems and a corresponding video documentation, as part of these two courses.

The quality of the 'filmmaking' is not part of the grading; all that officially matters are the ideas, and how they implemented them. However, students often enjoy creating quite polished videos.

 

1. Video Prototype using "UbiKit"

This is a video prototype showing a concept of a smart rehabilitation set to be taken home by the patients. The students used the "UbiKit" (see also above) for creating the mock-up in the video.

 

2. Computer Game with an unconventional Controller

Here, students demonstrate a video game that they made using the Processing environment. They control the game with their own experimental input device. The objective of this exercise was to combine a custom-made piece of hardware with own software.

 

3. "LightSight"

This is the prototype already mentioned above, which was created as a therapeutic toy for young children with problems in vision and motor skills.

 

4. Body-Tracking/Natural User Interfaces

This video is a screen-recording in which we can see students play their own Kinect-based video game. Hence, the objective of this exercise was to create a game incoporating body-tracking.

 

5. "Mindbubble"

This is an "arty" project where the user can attach virtual notes and thoughts to locations in a museum. This information can be found and accessed by other visitors.

 

References

  • [1] Güldenpfennig, F., Nunes, F., Subasi, Ö., & Urbanek, M. (2017). UbiKit: Learning to Prototype for Tangible and Ubiquitous Computing. In Proc British HCI’17.

  • [2] Güldenpfennig, F., Reitberger, W., & Fitzpatrick, G. (2012c). Through two different Lenses: A Tool for new Perspectives into Context. In Proc OzCHI’12, 170-179. 

  • [3] Salihodzic, H., Zilberburg, K., Chakhmaghi, N., Güldenpfennig, F., Fikar, P., & Ganhör, R. (2018). LightSight: A Dice to Meet the Eyes. In Proc Designing Interactive Systems (DIS’18).

 

14. 05. 09
Created: 09 May 2014

Impressum (German)

Angaben gemäß § 5 TMG:

Florian Güldenpfennig
Argentinierstraße 8
1040 Wien

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